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Reversing Osteoporosis through the Proven Benefits of Strength Training

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Reversing Osteoporosis through the Proven Benefits of Strength Training

Reversing osteoporosis by strengthening not only your muscles, but your bones as well!

When I started as a personal trainer 18 years ago, selling the concept of weight training to most women was not easy. Women were worried that lifting heavy weights would make them “bulky” or “manly”. I guess the idea of looking like Hulk Hogan in a dress isn’t too appealing.

But, neither is Osteoporosis.

Wichita Personal TrainingI’m sure everyone knows of someone who who has Osteopenia (onset of Osteoporosis) or Osteoporosis itself. Often it’s neglected and surfaces as an issue later in life with broken hips when an elder falls.

I’ve got great information on reversing Osteoporosis and getting started with home based workouts to prevent or improve your condition and keep your bones happy.

I’m happy to report that a lot has changed in the personal training industry in the last 18 years. Research and science has squashed the notion that weight training makes women bulky. I should also comment that it makes women look and feel lean, tone, strong, and confident.

Meet my client, Helen, in my Instagram picture. She is 70 years old and has Parkinson’s Disease and with that, we’ve increased her bone mineral density to that of a 35 year old woman.

For Helen, that’s very beneficial as she is prone to falling with the side effects of stutter stepping with Parkinson’s Disease. And, we don’t want any broken bones if she were to fall.

We’ve achieved Helen’s success through weight training. Sure, it helps with good looks but it also helps fix a serious issue called Osteoporosis! And, if you weren’t aware, Osteoporosis is two times more prevalent in women than in men.

Regardless of being male, female or your goals, weight training has proven benefits of preventing or reversing Osteoporosis.

That’s why I’m offering 14-days of Free Personal Training for those who need a coach to guide them to results like I’ve done for Helen.

So, what is Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is a bone disease that occurs when the body loses too much bone, makes too little bone, or a combination of both. As a result, bones become weak and may Wichita Personal Trainingbreak from a fall or, in serious cases, from just sneezing or minor bumps. I’m sure most people know of someone elderly who has fallen and broken a hip, right?

Osteoporosis literally means “porous bone.” Viewed under a microscope, healthy bone looks like a honeycomb. When osteoporosis occurs, the holes and spaces in the honeycomb are much larger than in healthy bone. Osteoporotic bones have lost density or mass and contain abnormal tissue structure. As bones become less dense, they weaken and are more likely to break.

Osteoporosis facts you should know:

  • Bones are not lifeless, but rather are actually living and growing tissue. Your bones are made up of three major components that make them flexible and strong.
  • Childhood and adolescences is the most valuable time to increase bone mineral density. I am predicting that Osteoporosis will be an even larger factor as kids and teenager are spending less time being active (i.e. running, falling, and jumping). Hopefully Pokémon Go can save our bones!
  • There are 2 types of Osteoporosis: Primary–which is usually related to older age, as well as reduced amount of estrogen in women. Secondary–affects both children and adults. It is related to other diseases and conditions such as cancer, hormonal issues, and certain medications.
  • During menopause women have a higher risk of Osteoporosis due to lack of estrogen production and bone-removing cells becoming more active.
  • Peak bone mineral density is from ages 25-35 years old.
  • As we age, the amount of bone reformation no longer keeps the pace with the amount of bones being resorbed (loss).
  • It is estimated that 1 in 3 women over 50 will experience osteoporotic fractures, as will 1 in 5 men.

 

You should also know:

  • Among white women, the risk of hip fracture is 1 in 6, compared with a 1 in 9 risk of a diagnosis of breast cancer (read that again).
  • Falls are responsible for 90% of hip fractures.
  • People over age of 50 who experience a hip fracture have 30% higher risk of mortality within the first year following.
  • Epidemiological evidence suggests that physical activity is associated with a significant reduction in risk of hip fractures for both genders.
  • Lifestyle plays an important role in bone health, as physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and other lifestyle factors like smoking.
  • Strengthening of the back musculature, particularly thoracic (upper back) extension is associated with a reduced risk of vertebral fractures and kyphosis.
  • Weight-bearing exercise can help to strengthen and even reverse the deterioration of bone tissue for all sufferers, even the elderly (i.e. jogging, sporting activities, and weightlifting).
  • The goal of exercise for individuals with Osteoporosis is to increase bone mineral density (stronger bones) and increase balance and power to decrease the chances of falls.

How does weightlifting help me have bones stronger than the Terminator?

Well, I’m glad you asked!

While the optimal strategy for preserving bone health is unclear, it is known that physical stress determines the strength of bone. Load (as in free weights, our bodies, and gravity) applied to bone results in a small deformation, or bending, of bone, referred to as strain. This response to bone loading stimulates bone deposition and associated gains in bone mass and strength.

Think of it like if there were cracks in your cement drive, and you came to repair it by adding another layer of cement to the top of the drive. This would increase the thickness and strength of the drive.

For this reason, weight bearing and bone jarring exercise such as weight lifting and plyometrics (playing, jumping, skipping, etc.) are recommended and can be incorporated in various ways. However, it is important to remember that the type of activity chosen will depend on the physical and medical condition of the individual.

Let’s wrap it up, but hopefully just the blog and not your knees.

Some might poke fun of the Life Alert commercials, but we can see from the stated facts above, just how serious the sound of “I’ve fallen and can get up” can really be!

Weight training and bone jarring activities can prevent and even help reverse bone deterioration. So, this is where my personal training experience kicks in and you get a complete workout guide to help fight the onset of Osteoporosis or improve the condition of those who have it. Please share with friends or family who could benefit from this information!

Reversing Osteoporosis Workout Guide

Osteoporosis workout basics for those who have been diagnosed or those at risk.

Mode

  • Weight bearing exercises and resistance training (70-80% of 1 rep max)
  • For prevention: include plyometric exercises
  • For diagnosed Osteoporosis: Exclude any jarring or high-impact activities such as running
  • Activities that promote balance and coordination should also be included for all

Intensity

  • Weight-bearing activities are best performed at high intensities that promote high-strain and stimulate bone adaptation
  • Strength-training activities should be of higher intensity

Duration

  • Duration of loading activities can be short (5 to 10 minutes)
  • For cardiovascular exercise, clients with Osteoporosis can follow the age-appropriate guidelines for the general public

Frequency

  • Multiple bouts of bone-loading exercises
  • Provide for adequate rest between exercise bouts
  • For cardiovascular exercise, clients can follow the age-appropriate guidelines for the general public

Reversing Osteoporosis Deterioration Weight Training Program

Note: There is no single exercise regimen that’s best for everyone with Osteoporosis. Each regimen should be specifically tailored to the individual person based on a medical evaluation. Before beginning any exercise program, it’s important to undergo a thorough medical examination to determine which activities are safe for you.

To prevent further injury and falls, people with spinal issues and other fractures, may need to avoid:

  • Spinal flexion, crunches, and rowing machines
  • Jumping and high-impact aerobics
  • Trampolines and step-aerobics
  • Abducting or adducting the legs against resistance
  • Pulling on the neck with hands behind the head

All exercises can be performed with body weight till progressed to free weights, as long as it enough intensity for 8 reps max.

Lower Body Workout


Dynamic warm-up

  • Foam rolling 5 minutes
  • Quadruped draws-ins- 1×10- 3 seconds hold per draw-in
  • Front plank or modified front plank – 1 set of 20-30 seconds
  • Side planks or modified side planks- 1 set of 15-20 seconds per side
  • Bird dogs-1 set of 10 reps per side
  • Supine bent knee marches – I set of 20 reps
  • Tall kneeling prisoner rotations- 1 set of 10 reps
  • Prone push-ups- 1 set of 10 reps
  • Partial superman- 1 set of 10 reps

Bone Loading Lower Body Resistance

(Take as much rest time as needed to recover between sets)

  • A1: Goblet Squats or Stability ball wall squats – 4 sets of 8 reps
  • B1: Dumbbell Dead lift- 4 sets of 8 reps
  • C1: Alternating Forward Dumbbell lunges- 3 sets of 16 reps (8 per side)
  • D1: Floor Bridges -3 sets of 8 reps
  • E1: Dumbbell Side lunges -3 sets of 8 reps

Cool-Down

  • Cat/camel – 1 set of 10 reps
  • Child’s pose -1 set of 30 seconds hold
  • Supine 90/90 hip rotator stretch -1 set of 20 seconds per side
  • Lunge hip flexor stretch -1 set of 20-30 seconds per side
  • Standing hamstring stretch -1 set of 20-30 seconds per side
  • Pillar stretch -1 set of 20-30 seconds
  • Open arms chest stretch –1 set of 20-30 seconds

Upper Body Workout


Warm-Up

  • Foam rolling 5 minutes
  • Quadruped draws-ins- 1×10- 3 second holds per draw-in
  • Front plank or modified front plank – 1 set of 20-30 seconds
  • Side planks or modified side planks -1 set of 15-20 seconds per side
  • Bird dogs -1 set of 10 reps per side
  • Supine bent knee marches –1 set of 20 reps
  • Tall kneeling prisoner rotations -1 set of 10 reps
  • Prone push-ups -1 set of 10 reps
  • Partial superman – 1 set of 10 reps

Bone Loading Upper Body Resistance

  • A1: Push-up or wall push-ups -3 sets of 8 reps
  • B1: Bent over (neutral grip) dumbbell rows – 4 sets of 8 reps
  • C1: Dumbbell bicep curls -3 sets of 8 reps
  • D1: Seated behind the neck dumbbell triceps extensions -3 sets of 8 reps
  • C1: Seated dumbbell shoulder press -3 sets of 8 reps
  • E1: Dumbbell wrist curls -3 sets of 8 reps
  • F1: Prone arm lifts (Y’s) -3 sets of 10 reps

Cool-Down

  • Cat/camel -1 set of 10 reps
  • Child’s pose -1 set of 30 seconds hold
  • Supine 90/90 hip rotator stretch -1 set of 20 seconds per side
  • Lunge hip flexor stretch -1 set of 20-30 seconds per side
  • Standing hamstring stretch -1 set of 20-30 seconds per side
  • Pillar stretch -1 set of 20-30 seconds
  • Open arms chest stretch -1 set of 30 seconds hold

 

RAYMONDRaymond Elliott

GoTimeTraining
Lead Personal Trainer & Personal Trainer School Director
ACE & NASM Certified Personal Trainer

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